This, That & Whatnot

2 notes

Dystopias: Not the End of the World

A dystopian future, a corrupt system of ruling, and a teenager that’s destined to bring it down. Sound familiar? ‘Course it does, my friends. Dystopias are everywhere you look, mostly dominating the YA market. This is not me griping about everyone’s unoriginality, because let’s face it, there are only so many plot frameworks that exist in the world and writing something that isn’t ‘new’ is not a problem if it’s done well. What I am wondering is what exactly this obsession with terrible future governments and the kids that take them apart says about us as writers and consumers.

It’s not as if this is a modern trend—people have been coming up with dystopian stories for as long as there have been governments to satirise or comment on, from totalitarian visions like George Orwell’s 1984 to William Gibson’s brand of cyberpunk. As one of my friends is fond of reminding me, The Hunger Games is in no way revolutionary since the exact same idea is played with in the ‘80s movieRunning Man and the Japanese novel Battle Royale. So no, nothing about this love for crappy systems pitting characters against each other is very new.

The fact that it’s emerged so strongly in the young adult section is interesting to me, though. There could be a lot of reasons for that: seeing children affected drives home how horrible things really are in this imagined world, young people have always been associated with revolution and new ideas, and we all have an instinctive fear that teenaged girls have the power to destroy us. Well, fair enough.

Read More…

Filed under divergent the hunger games the maze runner YA fiction dytopias this week's post

3,842 notes

judymartn:

I wanted to make a strong mother character. The portrayal of women in epic fantasy has been problematical for a long time. These books are largely written by men but women also read them in great, great numbers. And the women in fantasy tend to be very atypical women… They tend to be the woman warrior or the spunky princess who wouldn’t accept what her father lays down, and I have those archetypes in my books as well. However, with Catelyn there is something reset for the Eleanor of Aquitaine, the figure of the woman who accepted her role and functions with a narrow society and, nonetheless, achieves considerable influence and power and authority despite accepting the risks and limitations of this society. - GRRM on Catelyn Stark

(Source: judymartn, via love-is-not-over)

Filed under and iiiIIIIIIiiiiiIIIII will always love yooooooooooooooooOOOOOOOoo GoT

1,197 notes

"Mako is defined by the grey colour and the blue colour. As we go through the movie we find out that she’s defined by those colours because in her childhood we have a blue memory." "…The memory has left a stain on her hair that is blue, and she’s carrying that memory with her."

"On the other hand, Raleigh is in a colour space made up of greens, browns and amber."

"Mako and Raleigh complement each other, their colours are complementary. Their Jaeger cockpit, then, is mostly in blue and amber, their colours."

"And finally, they recuperate the heart. There’s a scene where they’re watching the robot in a service station and for the first time, the technicians uncover the heart of the robot. Mako and Raleigh are becoming vulnerable."

"And this is resolved, finally, by the reintroduction of the full red colour when they are together under the ocean."

[x]

(Source: meowzipan, via theleftnippleofgilgamesh)

Filed under Pacific Rim yeeeah symbolism!!